Research

Dynamical Gauge Fields

Within the Standard Model of Particle Physics, the interaction between fundamental particles is described by gauge theories. These theories have an enormous predictive power, but to compute the dynamics they generate is an extremely hard task. As a consequence, high-energy physics contains many unsolved problems such as quark confinement or the dynamics of quarks and gluons during heavy-ion collisions. Instead of computing them in classical devices or investigating them in enormous accelerator facilities, we aim at implementing lattice gauge theories on the optical table by having atomic gases in optical lattices mimic the interplay between particles, anti-particles, and gauge bosons. In this way, experiments at temperatures just above absolute zero could give insights into unsolved phenomena that in Nature appear at very high energies.

More details can be found on the project page.

A short (mathy) introduction

We wrote a blog post to give an introduction into the ideas underlying dynamical gauge fields. If you feel like it please take a look.

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A next-generation machine for Bose-Fermi mixtures

Given the wide-ranging applications of atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures for the investigation of fundamental physics, we are designing a next-generation experimental set-up.

Based on our experience with the existing machines, we will construct a set-up with improved speed, flexibility and precision. 

 

A short introduction to the Kondo effect

The investigation of the Kondo effects is one of the major motivations for the construction of the new experiment. It describes the peculiar interactions between previously non-interacting Fermions, which are induced by a single spin impurity at a certain temperature. Despite (or maybe because of) its large interest as a benchmark for various theoretical frameworks, it is typically quite hard to find accessible introductions in the literature. Here, I will give a very naive interpretation of the Kondo effect and discuss its possible observation in ultracold atomic gases.

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Fred Jendrzejewski
Fred Jendrzejewski
Telefon: +49 6221 54 5182
Raum: 02.106 
fnj@kip.uni-heidelberg.de